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Rachel S. Goldman, Ph.D.

Rachel S. Goldman, Ph.D.
Associate Professor of Materials Science & Engineering,
Applied Physics, and Electrical Engineering & Computer Science

 

Rachel S. Goldman is an Associate Professor of Materials Science & Engineering, Applied Physics, and Electrical Engineering & Computer Science at the University of Michigan (U–M). During the 2005–2006 academic year, she is the Augustus Anson Whitney Fellow at the Radcliffe Institute and the Division of Engineering and Applied Sciences at Harvard University. Goldman received her B.S. degree in Physics (High Honors with Distinction) from U–M in 1988, her M.S. degree in Applied Physics from Cornell University in 1992, and her Ph.D. in Materials Science from the University of California, San Diego in 1995. Following her Ph.D., she was a postdoctoral fellow in Physics at Carnegie Mellon University from 1995 to 1996. In 1997, she joined U–M as the Dow Corning Assistant Professor. Goldman's research interests are in the atomic–scale design of electronic materials, with a focus on the mechanisms of strain relaxation, alloy formation, and diffusion; and also in correlations between microstructure and electronic, magnetic, and optical properties of semiconductor films, nanostructures, and heterostructures. Goldman received the AVS Peter Mark Memorial Award in 2002, the U–M Ted Kennedy Family Team Award in 2004, a Radcliffe Fellowship from Harvard University in 2005, and a U–M Faculty Fellowship Enhancement Award in 2005. In addition, she received an NSF CAREER Award (1998–2004), a U–M Career Development Award (1999), a Poster Award from the Materials Research Society (MRS) (2000), and an MRS Graduate Student Award (1994). She is a member of the Board of Directors of AVS and the Past Chair of the Electronic Materials and Processing Division of AVS, as well as an Associate Editor of Journal of Vacuum Science and Technology A and Journal of Electronic Materials.

Dr. Goldman further describes her work:
In the Goldman Group, we are developing strategies for manipulating and identifying atoms in novel layered and nanostructured materials using molecular beam epitaxy, scanning tunneling microscopy, and a variety of in–situ and ex–situ characterization methods. We are also using these materials to examine the mechanisms of fundamental processes at the nanoscale— including strain relaxation, alloy formation, and diffusion—and correlations between nanometer–scale structure and electronic, magnetic, and optical properties. For example, we are examining direct correlations between atomic scale processes during epitaxial growth and the properties of semiconductor films, nanostructures, and heterostructures. Another interest is in illuminating the effects of segregation and clustering on ferromagnetism in semiconductors, toward the development of new spintronic devices operating above room temperature. In addition, we are exploring new methods for nanopatterning of semiconductors, including exploitation of elastic anisotropies and pre–patterning using focused ion beams. Both of these approaches are intended to enable the development of arrays of quantum dot nanostructures for new applications such as biomedical devices capable of detecting a range of viruses and/or bacteria.

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